Saturday, December 29

Feel My Deep and Wild


We can rarely change the way we do things, without the way we do things changing the things we do. And yes, by “we” I almost always mean “moi”. This is the reason why I am not all that surprised by the fact that I have been finding myself inking poetry into my storytelling and plotting longer tales into the bones of my poem(ing).

The same can be said about the books I read in 2018. I delighted in fiction and nonfiction with poetry in mind. And the poetry books that touched me the most planted stories in the inside of my chest and skull. The poem that follows was partly inspired by a handful of the books whose themes or structures or styles stuck (and will probably linger, for a while):

If you want to feel me, luv,
truly feel me and my ticker
go wild, just Poe me a bit.

Fill my brain housing group
with girls who know how to feed
on bonfires, on life slashing
truths (with a little Plath).

Crack my chest,
watch my blood breathe of springs
turned winter
(reckless thing!) without letting go
of warm blooms.

Caress my thighs with your wings, let flesh do human things to spirit. Luv, come with me... in the dark and bright of balanced chaos (no pretensions).   

Want to feel me, luv,
truly fill my deep and wild?
tale me and poem.


the wee notes…
- while reading The Clockwork Orange (a fave of moi), Bjรถrn dreamed up a prompt that asks us to “Write a poem in slang, by either using slang you are versed in or create it from another language you know” and such. I am not versed in slang. All right, I rather sucketh at the art of slanging it. So, I went ahead and grabbed some wee bits of Marine Corps lingo, word-played with Poe, weaved innuendo into the mix, linked it to The Garden, and hoped. 

- the titles that inspired the poem (and intro): The Poet X by Elizabeth Acevedo, Dr. Susan Love’s Breast Book by Susan M. Love, The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath, Seasons Defined by Khaya Ronkainen, and The World Doesn’t End by Charles Simic. I will probably tell you more about these books in a future post. I shall stop here, before some of you start running (in self-defense) from the nutty writer/reader who won’t stop ink-adoring.

detail from the cover of The Poet X

43 comments:

  1. This is what I asked for... getting those words in and using the well known and the Poe made Poem for me (with some Plath inside).

    The vivid passionate image of flesh and blood blended so well into this. Thank you for participating in the prompt.

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    1. Poe and Plath seem to have that effect on most of us.

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    2. Thanks a bunch for hosting, Bjorn.

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  2. Reading these words Ms Wicked, the strength of you and past wordsmiths combined to form a little ball busting ripsnorter... like swallowing a burst of energy ๐Ÿ˜Ž

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    1. "swallowing a burst of energy". I like that!

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  3. Your words and mindful, artful workings are always a pleasure ♡

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  4. Slang and I do not play well together either but a secret language? Oh my yes. a delightful poem this is with the Marine corps hoorah!

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  5. I luv what you’ve done with the prompt, Magaly, and it is so you: strong and honest, teasing the reader with wordplay and sexy sassiness! I especially love the lines:
    ‘Fill my brain housing group
    with girls who know how to feed
    on bonfires, on life slashing
    truths (with a little Plath)’
    and
    ‘Caress my thighs with your wings, let flesh do human things to spirit.’

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    1. Thank you, Kim. I think my favorite part of this prompt has been reading what everyone else has come up with. Wow!

      And yes, your irefay is still dancing in my head.

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  6. You did a good job on a hard task!!

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  7. If I wrote in "slang" none of you would be able to translate it lol (and it would probably get flagged as obscene) :D XXX

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    1. Now I want to read it. But you might have to write a dictionary companion, too. *CWS*

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    2. Lol I would Gina x

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    3. That's our Gina. ๐Ÿ˜

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  8. Clever and unique Love it.

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  9. Oh this is so good. "tale me and poem" Oh Yeah!

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  10. This is gorgeous and wild..and so delicious..just like you! Poe and Plath..inbreath-outbreath, what more could one ever ever want or need! I am so down with the bonfire-girls too!
    I am grinning...loved every minute of this.

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    1. I always wonder what a conversation between Poe and Plath would sound like... Can you imagine? Oh! "inbreath-outbreath" indeed!

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    2. lets add in a dinner for two and see how they would dine and dress...a banquet for the beautiful and strange! we could be the wild flies on the wall!

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    3. Let’s! You know we might have to do this, right? Oh, the glorious fun! ๐Ÿ–ค♥️

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  11. Blogger, why for you eat my original comment?!?

    *sigh* ANYWAY - I love how seamlessly the slang fits in to the piece. It's just gorgeously natural and vibrating with life.

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    1. Blogger stays hungry for originals. It gobbles they up like candy. It’s always waiting for more—it is known...

      Natural and vibriting Edith life. I really like that. Gracias!

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  12. "A Clockwork Orange" is a long-time fave of mine, too, and yes, a very distinct part of my love for this book is the slang language "nadsat" created for it by Anthony Burgess. Writing a poem entirely (or mainly) in slang in which you are well-versed? Hmmm, that is giving me ideas. Let's see if anything comes of it.

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    1. There is something about the use of slang while talking about a broken and corrupted society that just fits so well. If you have a chance, give Bjorn’s poem—the one he wrote for this prompt—a go. It’s quite brilliant.

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  13. The trouble with being human is that we are all very much the same and need to escape into an exclusive world where few others are welcome. We have of course been doing this for thousands of years. However your words do as usual entice us and make us desparate to join the club!

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    1. May our club grows and grows... in its want (and finding) for change and evolution and all around wonder.

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  14. Ah, there you are! I feel you deep and wild, you reckless thing...LOL, that's my attempt at slang.

    Your take on the prompt is brilliant and delightful. I especially like the second stanza "with girls who know how to feed / on bonfires".

    And, and...what a lovely surprise to see you already reserved a seat for me in your old-new home! To see my small Chap among these important and relevant works that inspired your poem above is a humbling experience. Thank you so much Maga for reading Seasons Defined, your encouraging feedback on Insta and for this shout-out. Much appreciated!

    Also, I was immediately drawn to Elizabeth Acevedo and her book; certainly one of the books I plan on reading in 2019. Thanks for the intro.

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    1. You’ve made me grin wildly wild, my friend. Like I said on Instagram, your words have taken roots... and in the next few weeks, we must share a cyber-cup if something yummy and discuss your words.

      I think you’ll love The Poet X. Ive already added to my must reread list.

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    2. YAY! So, looking forward to our cyber-cup and chat. <3

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    3. ๐Ÿ˜˜๐Ÿ–ค♥️

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  15. Unique and inky wild! Loved it.

    PS. I have added your new blog address to the RT blogroll.

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  16. Split, as I am, of world-things, mind-torn, spirit driven, heart-torn. Words tumble, jumble and crash. Against rocks of my own creations. Rush out of my mouth, stopped by my gnashing teeth. Gagging me! I've so much to say. So hard to articulate.
    I ache! So deeply I feel them all. Feel it all!

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  17. This felt like an amazing poetry slam performance to me. There was such dynamic energy, and I loved the fusion of the gritty with literary allusions.

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    1. It was a delight to write, from beginning to end.

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  18. You are brilliant! Your words are brilliant!! Big Hugs :)

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